Month: September 2014

On Half-Existence

Does anyone else get those days or weeks or months when you just lose sight of what you want, where you’re heading and why you’re doing all this living and moving and learning? For days on end, you forget to self-reflect: you simply wake up begrudgingly, eat whatever if easiest to make, go to school or work or whatever commitment you’ve arranged for the day, make some polite but disengaged conversation, come home and just waste time watching Will & Grace re-runs on your bed until your body asks you to sleep. There’s nothing worth remembering about days like these – they simply steal your energy and use it unsustainably. I entered into this sort of ennui at the start of this month, allowing myself to fall into a rut of negative energy and directionlessness. The happiness default I’d written about and prided myself at the start of year seemed to have escaped me – I felt sad and bored; I felt like I was moving along in some kind of half-existence. And it sucked! …

How to Help Save the Planet

In my first year of Uni, I joined an environmental action group. I’d always been conscious of global warming and the responsibility of humans to stop our planet from – you know – dying, so I thought joining a group was the natural next step for me. What actually happened, however, is that I eventually found myself feeling like a fraud. While I was a part of the group, I felt like it DEFINED me. I began feeling guilty whenever I turned on a power socket or opened a packaged product or bought a new item of clothing. In my heart, I quietly knew that I couldn’t go cold turkey on all these things, but in my head I kept scolding myself with “you should – if you truly cared, you would.” Hilariously, I came to a breakthrough a few weeks ago when I read a Tumblr text post that went something like this: “You’re a fan if you enjoy a few of their songs; you’re a fan if you could recite every track in …

Rain & Regeneration

As the car snaked along a slippery, paved path, an army of myrtle beech trees watched attentively on either side like ladders extending into the clouds. The misty day engulfed the car so it felt like we were driving inside a cloud, leaving layers of dew dripping from every overhanging branch, leaf and flower. It was hard to believe this place had ever been on fire. But on the 7th of February 2009, as I sat in my air-conditioned house one scorching summer’s day, Marysville was in flames. Located 97 kilometres north-east of Melbourne, the small Victorian town lost 90% of its land to the Murrindindi Mill fire of Black Saturday. As Steph and I drove into Marysville that Tuesday morning, it was both difficult to imagine and impossible to forget the tragedy of Black Saturday. The entrance to the town was flagged with a fire danger rating scale. The words “PREPARE. ACT. SURVIVE” painted below the scale sat inflated against the low-moderate rating of the day. We pulled up at a parking bay and …